KU News: KU Engineering to dedicate memorial highlighting contributions of Madison ‘Al’ and Lila Self

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School of Engineering to dedicate memorial highlighting contributions of Madison ‘Al’ and Lila Self
LAWRENCE — A memorial commemorating the life and legacy of two of the largest benefactors to the University of Kansas will be unveiled in a ceremony this week at the School of Engineering. The memorial includes photographs and biographical information about the Madison “Al” and Lisa Self, as well as details about the programs they established at KU. It will be dedicated at 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30, in the engineering courtyard terrace near Eaton Hall, Learned Hall and Spahr Library.

Fourth DEIB vice provost candidate to present Oct. 3
LAWRENCE — The fourth and final candidate for the University of Kansas Office of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion & Belonging (DEIB) vice provost position will give her public presentation from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3, in the Kansas Union Big 12 Room. Noelle Chaddock works internationally with colleges and universities as a keynote speaker, author, consultant, trainer and human developmentalist in equity, inclusion, access and anti-racism. The presentation will be livestreamed.

Center for East Asian Studies will host a book talk with Dianne Lee
LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas Center for East Asian Studies will host a book talk and panel discussion with Dianne Lee at 3:30 p.m. today, Sept. 29, in the Marvin Hall Forum. Lee is the author of “Leveraging Stereotypes to Your Advantage: Turning Stereotypes into Opportunities, Finding Balance Between the Yin and the Yang.” Faculty members from KU’s schools of Architecture & Design and Engineering will take part in the panel.

School of Social Welfare tackles ‘Grand Challenges for Social Work’ with 2022-2023 series
LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas School of Social Welfare’s Center for Community Engagement & Collaboration will again host a series of interactive panels highlighting current school research and community practice in areas related to the Grand Challenges for Social Work, beginning in October. The first event, from noon to 1:30 p.m. Oct. 20, highlights the Quality Improvement Center on Domestic Violence in Child Welfare.

Full stories below.

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Contact: Cody Howard, School of Engineering, 785-864-2936, [email protected], @kuengineering
School of Engineering to dedicate memorial highlighting contributions of Madison ‘Al’ and Lila Self

LAWRENCE — A memorial commemorating the life and legacy of two of the largest benefactors to the University of Kansas will be unveiled in a ceremony later this month at the KU School of Engineering.

The memorial honors Madison “Al” and Lila Self. In 2007, the couple established the Self Engineering Leadership Fellows Program, which seeks to identify and develop students who have a passion for leadership, business and engineering and possess a “fire in the belly” mentality.

Prior to the SELF Program at the engineering school, the Selfs established the Madison and Lila Self Graduate Fellowship in 1989 to support exceptional doctoral students in business, economics, engineering and mathematics and the biological, biomedical, pharmaceutical, bioinformatic and physical sciences.

“Fellows involved in the programs established by the Selfs distinguish themselves as leaders during their time at KU and after graduation,” said Corey Behrens, director of the Self Engineering Leadership Fellows Program. “It is fitting this memorial was made possible by the vision and generosity of alumni Fellows.”

The memorial includes photographs and biographical information about the Selfs, as well as details about the programs they established at KU. It will be dedicated at the engineering courtyard terrace near Eaton Hall, Learned Hall and Spahr Library at 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30.

Al Self graduated from KU in 1943 with a degree in chemical engineering. He was a successful businessman and a recipient of the school’s Distinguished Engineering Service Award in 2000. The Selfs, both native Kansans, met at KU.

Al and Lila each passed away in 2013. Their total lifetime giving to KU totals more than $108 million.

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Contact: Evan Riggs, Office of the Provost, 785-864-1085, [email protected], @KUProvost
Fourth DEIB vice provost candidate to present Oct. 3

LAWRENCE – The fourth candidate for the University of Kansas Office of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion & Belonging (DEIB) vice provost position will give her public presentation from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3, in the Kansas Union Big 12 Room.

The presentation will be livestreamed, and the passcode is 904893.

Noelle Chaddock is the fourth and final candidate who will present her philosophy on the role diversity and inclusion play in higher education in the United States and how her philosophy would advance Realizing Intersectional Standards of Excellence (RISE) on KU’s Lawrence and Edwards campuses and further KU’s mission considering current challenges and trends in higher education.

Chaddock works internationally with colleges and universities as a keynote speaker, author, consultant, trainer and human developmentalist in equity, inclusion, access and anti-racism. She also works with organizations, institutions, nonprofits, governance boards, civil and social services, performing arts and entertainment entities around cultivation, development and capacity in these areas. She has worked with corporate clients, health care providers, educators and law enforcement agencies from across the United States since 2001.

Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to offer their impressions and observations of each candidate online. There will be separate surveys for each of the four candidates where members of the KU community will have the chance to share their opinion of each candidate. Feedback on Chaddock’s presentation is due by 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5, and a recording of her presentation will be available here until the survey closes.

Each candidate will meet with Barbara A. Bichelmeyer, provost and executive vice chancellor, as well as campuswide DEIB leaders and DEIB office staff, vice provosts, deans, Kansas Athletics, faculty-staff affinity groups, university governance and a representative from the chancellor’s office during their campus visit.
Chaddock is an independent consultant, and she has been among senior leadership as the director of culture and equity on multiple development and research projects during that time. She works with intact organizational and educational teams on strategic planning, talent cultivation, board development, leadership and organizational assessment and data-driven training and development. She also serves as an adjunct professor of women’s gender and sexuality studies at James Madison University.

Prior to her work as an independent consultant, Chaddock worked in higher education for more than a decade. She served as the vice president of equity and inclusion at Bates College from 2019 until 2021, making her the first Black vice president at the school. She diversified incoming faculty cohorts from 30% racial diversity to 65% in her first year at Bates College. Prior to that, she served as associate provost at Rhodes College from 2016 until 2019. She has also held the leadership positions of inaugural chief diversity officer and Title IX deputy coordinator.

Chaddock teaches and publishes in social theory, Black feminism and Black dramaturgy and theatre. She is an author with 11 publications, including her book “Antagonizing White Feminism: Intersectionality’s Critique of Women’s Studies and the Academy.”

Chaddock earned her bachelor’s degree in human development, a master’s degree in philosophy, a graduate certificate in feminist theory and a doctorate from Binghamton University.

More information about the search and each of the candidates is available online.

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Contact: LaGretia Copp, Center for East Asian Studies, 785-864-0307, [email protected], @KUEastAsia
Center for East Asian Studies will host a book talk with Dianne Lee

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas Center for East Asian Studies will host a book talk and panel discussion with author Dianne Lee at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29, in the Marvin Hall Forum. The first 35 students will receive a free copy of Lee’s book, “Leveraging Stereotypes to Your Advantage: Turning Stereotypes into Opportunities, Finding Balance Between the Yin and the Yang.” There will be a book signing and refreshments after the event.

Growing up in the 1980s in Malaysia, Lee and her family lived a typical Malaysian Chinese life. Her mother started an adhesive tape packaging business in the 1980s while her father worked for a large company. After completing her secondary schooling in Malaysia, she studied at Indiana State University and remained in the U.S. after graduation. Now, as the executive director of Kitchell Construction and Project Management, she handles business development for Kitchell in the architecture, engineering and construction space, taking on client development and billion-dollar contracts.

In her book, Lee shares how she has had to turn negative situations into positive success stories, both personally and professionally. She deconstructs how society views stereotypes as mostly negative characteristics and demonstrates that if certain traits persist, they can be detrimental to one’s life, but with the right approach, strategy and mindset, those negative experiences can be used as an advantage.

In a recent podcast with Womenpreneur Asia, Lee said, “I’m a very proud Chinese Malaysian, an Asian American. This is who I am. I refuse to let anybody diminish who we are and the contributions that we bring to this country. I worked really hard for my position. I work harder than a lot of other people because I’m a woman and because I’m a minority, and I work in a very Caucasian and male-dominated industry.”

After her book talk, Lee will join Nilou Vakil, associate professor of architecture, and Caroline Bennett, professor and associate chair of graduate studies in the School of Engineering, in a panel talk on women in STEM moderated by Hui Cai, chair of the architecture department.

Akiko Takeyama, the director of the Center for East Asia Studies, said the event is a way to bring together the important issues of gender, leadership, STEM and Global Asia.

“Dianne is a leader in the male-dominated architecture and construction industries,” Takeyama said. “She is committed to nurturing women and people of color in the fields. Our sponsors for this event demonstrate the wide range of interest in the intersection of these topics.”

The event is co-sponsored by the schools of Engineering and Architecture & Design, Office of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion & Belonging, and the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity.

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Don’t miss new episodes of “When Experts Attack!,”
a KU News Service podcast hosted by Kansas Public Radio.

https://kansaspublicradio.org/when-experts-attack
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Contact: Melinda Lewis, School of Social Welfare, [email protected], @KUSocialWelfare
School of Social Welfare tackles ‘Grand Challenges for Social Work’ with 2022-2023 series

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas School of Social Welfare’s Center for Community Engagement & Collaboration will again host a series of interactive panels highlighting current school research and community practice in areas related to the Grand Challenges for Social Work, beginning in October.

The Grand Challenges highlighted in these events align with major scholarship initiatives within the School of Social Welfare and critical concerns facing society: building healthy relationships to end family violence and closing the health gap. These events will be held virtually to facilitate access for KU alumni and partners across the country and to highlight the collaborative scholarship. Participants will be able to receive 1.5 hours CEUs for attending each free event.

“As social workers, we are committed to advancing justice and building capacity to meet the ‘Grand Challenges’ our society faces. Within the school, scholars, students and our community partners are pursuing scholarship and innovating practice to address these critical issues in this especially crucial moment. These events give us opportunities to consider together — as scholars, practitioners and allies — where we are today and what we must bring to the future,” said Melinda Lewis, associate director, Center for Community Engagement & Collaboration.

The first event, from noon to 1:30 p.m. Oct. 20, highlights the Quality Improvement Center on Domestic Violence in Child Welfare. Juliana Carlson, associate professor of social welfare, led an evaluation of the QIC, which works across multiple sectors to advance an adult and child survivor-centered approach. Carlson will be joined by her partners, Lonna Davis, Futures Without Violence; Gary Taylor, independent consultant and child welfare expert; and Ruby White Starr, Latinos United for Peace & Equity, to share their collaboration and the practice implications of their findings. Participants will learn about how changes in the child welfare system and in organizations that serve survivors of domestic violence can integrate practice wisdom and research from each and from the science of trauma and resilience, to respond to survivors’ unique needs, address behaviors of the person who caused harm and create safer contexts for everyone. Event registration is now open.

In spring 2023, KU Research Project Director Cheryl Holmes will share her work to center rural perspectives in public health agendas — including in the crucial decisions required to respond to the evolving COVID-19 emergency. From noon to 1:30 p.m. April 20, 2023, Holmes and her partners — Elizabeth Reid, Migrant Farmworkers Assistance Fund, and Darrel Box, Lafayette Regional Health Center — will introduce participants to the communities in rural Missouri that were part of this investigation. The panel will consider how the lessons learned in this participatory research can be incorporated into patient-centered research, policy and practice, to help close the health gap with a greater focus on rural needs and perspectives. Event registration is now open.

Amy Mendenhall, associate dean for research in the social welfare school, said that the Grand Challenges for Social Work series would likely continue in fall 2023.

“For social work, the Grand Challenges have served to focus our profession on the contributions we already make to address unmet needs, as well as the considerable distance that remains on our journey to social, economic, racial and environmental justice,” she said. “Our school’s scholars, practicum agencies, students and community partners doing important work to address the Grand Challenges, and we are honored to use the CCEC platform to elevate their stories.”

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