KU News: KU School of Pharmacy lowers nonresident tuition

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KU School of Pharmacy lowers nonresident tuition

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas School of Pharmacy has lowered its nonresident tuition $50,000 over the course of its four-year Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program. The tuition reduction applies to first-year pharmacy students admitted during the current academic year and beyond. “In an era when the health care of Kansans is being negatively affected by a shortage of pharmacists, we hope this tuition adjustment for out-of-state students will provide more opportunity for aspiring pharmacists to pursue their career goals and meet the needs of patients across our state,” said Ronald Ragan, dean of the School of Pharmacy.

Jayhawks named semifinalists for student Fulbright awards

LAWRENCE – Nine University of Kansas students and alumni have advanced to the semifinalist round for Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards, which will provide funding to study, conduct research or teach English abroad for the 2024-2025 academic year. Semifinalists include Kansans from Kansas City, Lawrence, Shawnee and Topeka.

Law Journal Symposium to explore art law complexities

LAWRENCE – On Feb. 23, the 2024 Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy Symposium will host academics, legal scholars and museum professionals for discussions rooted in the public policy considerations of art law issues. Event speakers will include experts from the Department of Defense, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the Smithsonian and the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Registration is required for the free public event.

 

Full stories below.

 

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Contact: Brad Stauffer, School of Pharmacy, [email protected], @KUPharmacy

KU School of Pharmacy lowers nonresident tuition

 

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas School of Pharmacy has lowered its nonresident tuition $50,000 over the course of its four-year Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program. The tuition reduction applies to first-year pharmacy students admitted during the current academic year and beyond.

Over the course of the four-year Pharm.D. program, tuition for nonresident students is now $133,378. The cost of pharmacy tuition for Kansas residents is $106,579.

“In an era when the health care of Kansans is being negatively affected by a shortage of pharmacists, we hope this tuition adjustment for out-of-state students will provide more opportunity for aspiring pharmacists to pursue their career goals and meet the needs of patients across our state,” said Ronald Ragan, dean of the School of Pharmacy. “We need to encourage more talented students to enroll in pharmacy school, and cost is certainly one factor that can influence that decision. I’m optimistic that lowering our tuition for nonresident students will increase our enrollment and grow our workforce in Kansas.”

Ragan noted that KU offers one of the country’s top Pharm.D. programs and is also well known for its history of research, discovery and drug development. KU pharmacy students taking the North American Pharmacist Licensure Exam (NAPLEX) for the first time last year passed at a rate of 91%, ranking them 13th nationally. It was an increase of 5% over the previous year and well above the national average of 79%.

The KU School of Pharmacy is currently accepting applications through June 1 for the fall 2024 semester. For more information on enrollment, visit the pharmacy school website.

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Don’t miss new episodes of “When Experts Attack!,”

a KU News Service podcast hosted by Kansas Public Radio.

 

https://kansaspublicradio.org/when-experts-attack

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Contact: Christine Metz Howard, International Affairs, [email protected], @KUintlaffairs

Jayhawks named semifinalists for student Fulbright awards

 

LAWRENCE – Nine University of Kansas students and alumni have advanced to the semifinalist round for Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards, which will provide funding to study, conduct research or teach English abroad for the 2024-2025 academic year.

This year’s Fulbright semifinalists represent diverse academic fields across campus, coming from the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences and the schools of Journalism & Mass Communication and Education & Human Sciences. The semifinalists’ locations of proposed study span three continents and eight countries.

The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program and is designed to increase mutual understanding between Americans and people of other countries. The Fulbright U.S. Student Program operates in more than 160 countries worldwide.

Recipients of Fulbright grants are selected based on academic or professional achievement as well as their record of service and demonstrated leadership in their respective fields. Fulbright grants provide funding for round-trip travel, maintenance for one academic year, health and accident insurance and, where relevant, tuition.

Finalists and alternates will be announced later this spring.

2024-2025 Fulbright semifinalists

Raneem Alasmi has applied to be an English teaching assistant in Switzerland. Originally from Syria and then Kansas City, Kansas, Alasmi will graduate in December with a bachelor’s degree in journalism with a focus on multimedia and minor in French. Her parents are Hanna Alasmi and Nazzal Alasmi.

Jenna Bellemere has applied to be an English teaching assistant in Mexico. From Lawrence, Bellemere will graduate in May with bachelor’s degrees in anthropology and women, gender & sexuality studies. Her parents are Fred Bellemere and Kim Mahanna-Bellemere.

Samantha Brant has proposed to study and conduct research in education at Durham University in the United Kingdom. From Topeka and currently living in Kansas City, Missouri, Brant received a master’s degree in education from KU in 2015. Her parents are David and Deba Brant.

Anabel Cardoza has applied to be an English teaching assistant in Mexico. From Kansas City, Kansas, Cardoza will graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in linguistics and a minor in Spanish. Her parents are Jeronimo Cardoza and María Cortez.

Finn Finnerty has applied to be an English teaching assistant in Germany. From Lee’s Summit, Missouri, Finnerty will graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in foreign language education and minors in German and Spanish. Their parents are Miranda and Scott Finnerty.

Alicia Houser has proposed to travel to Tanzania to study and conduct research in history. Houser is a doctoral student in history. Houser has a master’s degree in public and international affairs from the University of Pittsburgh and bachelor’s degrees in international relations and African studies from Austin College. Her parents are Bryan Houser and Janice Hileman.

Rachel Paese has applied to be an English teaching assistant in Spain. From St. Louis, Paese will graduate in May with bachelor’s degrees in English and Spanish and a minor in sociology. Her parents are Matthew Paese and Becky Paese-Mullen.

Kahill Perkins has applied to be an English teaching assistant in Malta. From Lawrence, Perkins will graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in English with a concentration in creative writing and is pursuing an accelerated master’s degree in literary theory. Her parents are William Perkins and Jennifer Dixon-Perkins.

Theresa Read has proposed to travel to Sweden to study and conduct research in chemistry. Living in Shawnee, Read will graduate in May with bachelor’s degrees in chemistry and biochemistry. Her husband is Justin Read, and her son is Dalamar Read.

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Follow @KUNews for KU News Service stories,

discoveries and experts.

 

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Contact: Emma Herrman, School of Law, [email protected], @kulawschool

Law Journal Symposium to explore art law complexities

 

LAWRENCE – On Feb. 23, the 2024 Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy Symposium will host academics, legal scholars and museum professionals for discussions rooted in the public policy considerations of art law issues.

“This year’s symposium is about the intersection of art and law in the United States,” said Megan Gannon, symposium editor. “Symposium attendees will discover the interdisciplinary nature of art law through policy-based discussions of restitution and repatriation, trade of cultural property and the ethical stewardship of objects in museum collections.”

“A Museum’s Purpose: Discussions of Art and Law in 2024” will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the University of Kansas School of Law in Green Hall. Check-in and breakfast will begin at 8:30 a.m. This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Register and preview the complete symposium schedule.

Event speakers:

Craig Blackwell, Smithsonian Office of the General Counsel
Col. Scott DeJesse, U.S. Department of Defense
Derek Fincham, South Texas College of Law Houston
Mike Hoeflich, KU School of Law
MacKenzie Mallon, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Nick O’Donnell, Sullivan & Worcester
Lauren van Schilfgaarde, UCLA School of Law
Jonathan Zwibel, U.S. Customs and Border Protection

The symposium is sponsored by the Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy. Scholarship associated with the symposium will be published in an upcoming issue of the Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy. For more information, contact Megan Gannon by email.

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Erinn Barcomb-Peterson, director of news and media relations, [email protected]

 

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