Crop production

0
319

ISSN: 1936-3737

Released January 12, 2015, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service
(NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of
Agriculture (USDA).

Orange Production Down 3 Percent from December Forecast

The United States all orange forecast for the 2014-2015 season is
6.72 million tons, down 3 percent from the previous forecast and down
1 percent from the 2013-2014 final utilization. The Florida all orange
forecast, at 103 million boxes (4.64 million tons), is down 5 percent from
the previous forecast and 2 percent from last season’s final utilization.
Early, midseason, and Navel varieties in Florida are forecast at 48.0
million
boxes (2.16 million tons), down 8 percent from the previous forecast and
down
10 percent last season’s final utilization. The Florida Valencia orange
forecast, at 55.0 million boxes (2.48 million tons), is down 2 percent from
previous forecast but up 7 percent from last season’s final utilization.

Florida frozen concentrated orange juice (FCOJ) yield forecast for the
2014-2015 season is 1.59 gallons per box at 42.0 degrees Brix, down 1
percent
from the December forecast but up 1 percent from last season’s final yield
of
1.57 gallons per box. The early-midseason portion is projected at
1.45 gallons per box, down 5 percent from last season’s yield. The Valencia
portion is projected at 1.72 gallons up 5 percent from last year’s final
yield of 1.64 gallons per box. All projections of yield assume the
processing
relationships this season will be similar to those of the past several
seasons.

This report was approved on January 12, 2015.

Secretary of Agriculture
Designate
Michael T. Scuse

Agricultural Statistics Board
Chairperson
James M. Harris

Contents

Utilized Production of Citrus Fruits by Crop – States and United States:
2013-2014 and Forecasted
January 1,
2015……………………..

……………………………………….
………………  4Hay Stocks on Farms – States and United States: May 1 and December 1, 2013
and 2014………………….  5

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Domestic Units –
United States: 2014 and 2015..  6

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Metric Units –
United States: 2014 and 2015….  8

Fruits and Nuts Production – United States: 2014 and 2015 (Domestic
Units)…………………………. 10

Fruits and Nuts Production in Metric Units – United States: 2014 and
2015……………………..…… 11

Percent of Normal Precipitation
Map……………………………………………………………. 12

Departure from Normal Temperature
Map………………………………………………………….. 12

December Weather
Summary…………………..……………………………………….
………… 13

December Agricultural
Summary…………………..……………………………………….
……. 13

Crop
Comments………………….……………………………………….
…………………… 14

Statistical
Methodology……………….……………………………………….
…………….. 16

Information
Contacts………………….……………………………………….
…………….. 17

Utilized Production of Citrus Fruits by Crop – States and United States:
2013-2014 and
Forecasted January 1, 2015
[The crop year begins with the bloom of the first year shown and ends with
the completion of harvest the
following year]
—————————————————————————-
———————————-
:     Utilized production boxes 1/      :
Utilized production ton equivalent
Crop and State
:—————————–———————————————-
—-
:     2013-2014     :     2014-2015     :
2013-2014     :     2014-2015
—————————————————————————-
———————————-
:      ——- 1,000 boxes ——-
——- 1,000 tons ——
Oranges                       :

Early, mid, and Navel 2/      :

California ……………..:       39,000              40,000
1,560               1,600
Florida ………………..:       53,300              48,000
2,398               2,160
Texas ………………….:        1,400               1,670
60                  71
:

United States …………..:       93,700              89,670
4,018               3,831
:

Valencia                      :

California ……………..:       11,000              10,000
440                 400
Florida ………………..:       51,300              55,000
2,309               2,475
Texas ………………….:          376                 345
16                  15
:

United States …………..:       62,676              65,345
2,765               2,890
:

All                           :

California ……………..:       50,000              50,000
2,000               2,000
Florida ………………..:      104,600             103,000
4,707               4,635
Texas ………………….:        1,776               2,015
76                  86
:

United States …………..:      156,376             155,015
6,783               6,721
:

Grapefruit                    :

White                         :

Florida ………………..:        4,150               4,000
176                 170
:

Colored                       :

Florida ………………..:       11,500              11,000
489                 468
:

All                           :

California ……………..:        4,000               4,000
160                 160
Florida ………………..:       15,650              15,000
665                 638
Texas ………………….:        5,700               6,000
228                 240
:

United States …………..:       25,350              25,000
1,053               1,038
:

Tangerines and mandarins      :

Arizona 3/ ……………….:          200                 220
8                   9
California 3/ …………….:       14,500              15,500
580                 620
Florida ………………….:        2,900               2,500
138                 119
:

United States …………….:       17,600              18,220
726                 748
:

Lemons                        :

Arizona ………………….:        1,800               2,200
72                  88
California ……………….:       19,000              20,000
760                 800
:

United States …………….:       20,800              22,200
832                 888
:

Tangelos                      :

Florida ………………….:          880                 800
40                  36
—————————————————————————-
———————————-
1/ Net pounds per box: oranges in California-80, Florida-90, Texas-85;
grapefruit in California-80,
Florida-85, Texas-80; tangerines and mandarins in Arizona and
California-80, Florida-95; lemons-80;
tangelos-90.

2/ Navel and miscellaneous varieties in California. Early (including Navel)
and midseason varieties in Florida
and Texas. Small quantities of tangerines in Texas and Temples in
Florida.
3/ Includes tangelos and tangors.

Hay Stocks on Farms – States and United States: May 1 and December 1, 2013
and 2014
—————————————————————————-
——————-
:                 May 1                 :
December 1
State
:—————————–———————————————-
—-
:       2013        :       2014        :       2013        :
2014
—————————————————————————-
——————-
:                                  1,000 tons

:

Alabama …….:         215                 300               1,470
1,495
Arizona …….:          35                  35                 200
320
Arkansas ……:         170                 550               2,150
2,050
California ….:         320                 140               1,900
1,750
Colorado ……:         360                 320               1,400
1,800
Connecticut …:           7                   8                  50
48
Delaware ……:           3                   2                  32
28
Florida …….:          25                  55                 460
570
Georgia …….:         250                 170               1,150
1,030
Idaho ………:         570                 320               2,350
2,250
:

Illinois ……:         155                 310               1,150
1,300
Indiana …….:         110                 200               1,040
1,070
Iowa ……….:         290                 410               2,750
2,950
Kansas ……..:         460               1,340               4,500
3,700
Kentucky ……:         470                 700               4,200
3,300
Louisiana …..:         150                 105                 500
820
Maine ………:          22                  18                 120
130
Maryland ……:          75                  70                 290
285
Massachusetts .:          12                  19                  69
50
Michigan ……:         140                 270               1,140
2,000
:

Minnesota …..:         490                 440               3,180
3,050
Mississippi …:         200                 160               1,250
900
Missouri ……:         600               1,800               5,900
5,500
Montana …….:         860                 875               4,700
4,600
Nebraska ……:         610               1,150               3,800
4,600
Nevada ……..:         140                  45                 650
751
New Hampshire .:          10                   6                  21
43
New Jersey ….:          15                  22                 110
118
New Mexico ….:         105                  90                 400
435
New York ……:         150                 330               2,000
1,330
:

North Carolina :         240                 220               1,380
1,300
North Dakota ..:         880               1,200               4,900
5,400
Ohio ……….:         140                 275               1,500
1,550
Oklahoma ……:         700               1,100               3,900
5,100
Oregon ……..:         230                 210               1,700
1,640
Pennsylvania ..:         300                 300               2,000
1,720
Rhode Island ..:           1                   1                   7
7
South Carolina :         110                  95                 440
370
South Dakota ..:         850               1,480               5,400
6,000
Tennessee …..:         425                 630               3,370
3,050
:

Texas ………:       1,650               1,350               5,900
7,500
Utah ……….:         230                 300               1,250
1,190
Vermont …….:          36                  45                 205
182
Virginia ……:         410                 470               2,450
1,950
Washington ….:         180                 290               1,200
1,450
West Virginia .:         145                 235                 870
910
Wisconsin …..:         410                 435               2,900
2,960
Wyoming …….:         200                 280               1,000
1,500
:

United States .:      14,156              19,176              89,304
92,052
—————————————————————————-
——————-

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Domestic Units –
United States: 2014 and 2015
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2015 crop
year.
Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
—————————————————————————-
—-
:     Area planted      :    Area harvested

Crop
:—————————–——————
:   2014    :   2015    :   2014    :   2015

—————————————————————————-
—-
:                  1,000 acres

:

Grains and hay                  :

Barley …………………….:    2,975                   2,443

Corn for grain 1/ …………..:   90,597                  83,136

Corn for silage …………….:     (NA)                   6,371

Hay, all …………………..:     (NA)                  57,092

Alfalfa ………………….:     (NA)                  18,445

All other ………………..:     (NA)                  38,647

Oats ………………………:    2,723                   1,029

Proso millet ……………….:      505                     430

Rice ………………………:    2,939                   2,919

Rye ……………………….:    1,434                     258

Sorghum for grain 1/ ………..:    7,138                   6,401

Sorghum for silage ………….:     (NA)                     315

Wheat, all …………………:   56,822                  46,381

Winter …………………..:   42,399     40,452       32,304

Durum ……………………:    1,398                   1,337

Other spring ……………..:   13,025                  12,740

:

Oilseeds                        :

Canola …………………….:  1,714.0                 1,555.7

Cottonseed …………………:      (X)                     (X)

Flaxseed …………………..:      311                     302

Mustard seed ……………….:     33.6                    31.2

Peanuts ……………………:  1,354.0                 1,325.0

Rapeseed …………………..:      2.2                     2.1

Safflower ………………….:    181.5                   170.2

Soybeans for beans ………….:   83,701                  83,061

Sunflower ………………….:  1,560.8                 1,507.6

:

Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops:

Cotton, all ………………..: 11,037.0                 9,707.4

Upland …………………..: 10,845.0                 9,518.0

American Pima …………….:    192.0                   189.4

Sugarbeets …………………:  1,161.6                 1,147.2

Sugarcane ………………….:     (NA)                   874.1

Tobacco ……………………:     (NA)                   378.4

:

Dry beans, peas, and lentils    :

Austrian winter peas ………..:     24.0                    16.8

Dry edible beans ……………:  1,718.9                 1,665.7

Dry edible peas …………….:    935.0                   899.5

Lentils ……………………:    281.0                   259.0

Wrinkled seed peas ………….:     (NA)                    (NA)

:

Potatoes and miscellaneous      :

Coffee (Hawaii) …………….:     (NA)                     7.9

Hops ………………………:     (NA)                    38.0

Peppermint oil ……………..:     (NA)                    63.1

Potatoes, all ………………:  1,061.1                 1,049.5

Spring …………………..:     73.8                    71.1

Summer …………………..:     50.4                    48.9

Fall …………………….:    936.9                   929.5

Spearmint oil ………………:     (NA)                    24.4

Sweet potatoes ……………..:    137.3                   135.2

Taro (Hawaii) 2/ ……………:     (NA)                     0.4

—————————————————————————-
—-
See footnote(s) at end of table.
–continued

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Domestic Units –
United States: 2014 and 2015 (continued)
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from
previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2015 crop year.
Blank data
cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
—————————————————————————-
———–
:   Yield per acre    :
Production
Crop
:—————————–—————–
:   2014   :   2015   :    2014
:   2015
—————————————————————————-
———–
:                       —— 1,000
—–
:

Grains and hay                          :

Barley ……………………..bushels:   72.4                   176,794

Corn for grain ………………bushels:  171.0                14,215,532

Corn for silage ………………..tons:   20.1                   128,048

Hay, all ………………………tons:   2.45                   139,798

Alfalfa ……………………..tons:   3.33                    61,446

All other ……………………tons:   2.03                    78,352

Oats ……………………….bushels:   67.7                    69,684

Proso millet ………………..bushels:   31.4                    13,483

Rice 3/ ………………………..cwt:  7,572                   221,035

Rye ………………………..bushels:   27.9                     7,189

Sorghum for grain ……………bushels:   67.6                   432,575

Sorghum for silage ……………..tons:   13.1                     4,123

Wheat, all ………………….bushels:   43.7                 2,025,651

Winter ……………………bushels:   42.6                 1,377,526

Durum …………………….bushels:   39.7                    53,087

Other spring ………………bushels:   46.7                   595,038

:

Oilseeds                                :

Canola ………………………pounds:  1,614                 2,510,995

Cottonseed …………………….tons:    (X)                   5,314.0

Flaxseed ……………………bushels:   21.1                     6,368

Mustard seed …………………pounds:    930                    29,004

Peanuts ……………………..pounds:  3,932                 5,210,100

Rapeseed …………………….pounds:  1,233                     2,590

Safflower ……………………pounds:  1,226                   208,643

Soybeans for beans …………..bushels:   47.8                 3,968,823

Sunflower ……………………pounds:  1,469                 2,214,835

:

Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops        :

Cotton, all 3/ ………………..bales:    795                  16,084.0

Upland 3/ …………………..bales:    781                  15,496.0

American Pima 3/ …………….bales:  1,490                     588.0

Sugarbeets …………………….tons:   27.4                    31,386

Sugarcane ……………………..tons:   35.3                    30,869

Tobacco ……………………..pounds:  2,316                   876,415

:

Dry beans, peas, and lentils            :

Austrian winter peas 3/ ………….cwt:  1,339                       225

Dry edible beans 3/ ……………..cwt:  1,753                    29,206

Dry edible peas 3/ ………………cwt:  1,907                    17,155

Lentils 3/ ……………………..cwt:  1,300                     3,367

Wrinkled seed peas ………………cwt:   (NA)                       618

:

Potatoes and miscellaneous              :

Coffee (Hawaii) ………………pounds:  1,030                     8,100

Hops ………………………..pounds:  1,868                  70,995.9

Peppermint oil ……………….pounds:     90                     5,692

Potatoes, all …………………..cwt:    426                   446,693

Spring ……………………….cwt:    318                    22,608

Summer ……………………….cwt:    322                    15,756

Fall …………………………cwt:    439                   408,329

Spearmint oil ………………..pounds:    114                     2,784

Sweet potatoes ………………….cwt:    219                    29,584

Taro (Hawaii) ………………..pounds:   (NA)                     3,240

—————————————————————————-
———–
(NA) Not available.

(X)  Not applicable.

1/   Area planted for all purposes.

2/   Area is total acres in crop, not harvested acres.

3/   Yield in pounds.

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Metric Units –
United States: 2014 and 2015
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2015 crop
year.
Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
—————————————————————————-
—-
:     Area planted      :    Area harvested

Crop
:—————————–——————
:   2014    :   2015    :   2014    :   2015

—————————————————————————-
—-
:                   hectares

:

Grains and hay                  :

Barley …………………….: 1,203,950                 988,660

Corn for grain 1/ …………..:36,663,700              33,644,310

Corn for silage …………….:      (NA)               2,578,280

Hay, all 2/ ………………..:      (NA)              23,104,560

Alfalfa ………………….:      (NA)               7,464,510

All other ………………..:      (NA)              15,640,050

Oats ………………………: 1,101,970                 416,430

Proso millet ……………….:   204,370                 174,020

Rice ………………………: 1,189,380               1,181,290

Rye ……………………….:   580,330                 104,410

Sorghum for grain 1/ ………..: 2,888,680               2,590,420

Sorghum for silage ………….:      (NA)                 127,480

Wheat, all 2/ ………………:22,995,300              18,769,930

Winter …………………..:17,158,450  16,370,520  13,073,110

Durum ……………………:   565,760                 541,070

Other spring ……………..: 5,271,090               5,155,750

:

Oilseeds                        :

Canola …………………….:   693,640                 629,580

Cottonseed …………………:       (X)                     (X)

Flaxseed …………………..:   125,860                 122,220

Mustard seed ……………….:    13,600                  12,630

Peanuts ……………………:   547,950                 536,210

Rapeseed …………………..:       890                     850

Safflower ………………….:    73,450                  68,880

Soybeans for beans ………….:33,872,960              33,613,960

Sunflower ………………….:   631,640                 610,110

:

Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops:

Cotton, all 2/ ……………..: 4,466,560               3,928,490

Upland …………………..: 4,388,860               3,851,840

American Pima …………….:    77,700                  76,650

Sugarbeets …………………:   470,090                 464,260

Sugarcane ………………….:      (NA)                 353,740

Tobacco ……………………:      (NA)                 153,120

:

Dry beans, peas, and lentils    :

Austrian winter peas ………..:     9,710                   6,800

Dry edible beans ……………:   695,620                 674,090

Dry edible peas …………….:   378,390                 364,020

Lentils ……………………:   113,720                 104,810

Wrinkled seed peas ………….:      (NA)                    (NA)

:

Potatoes and miscellaneous      :

Coffee (Hawaii) …………….:      (NA)                   3,200

Hops ………………………:      (NA)                  15,380

Peppermint oil ……………..:      (NA)                  25,540

Potatoes, all 2/ ……………:   429,420                 424,720

Spring …………………..:    29,870                  28,770

Summer …………………..:    20,400                  19,790

Fall …………………….:   379,150                 376,160

Spearmint oil ………………:      (NA)                   9,870

Sweet potatoes ……………..:    55,560                  54,710

Taro (Hawaii) 3/ ……………:      (NA)                     150

—————————————————————————-
—-
See footnote(s) at end of table.
–continued

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Metric Units –
United States: 2014 and 2015 (continued)
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2015 crop
year.
Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
—————————————————————————-
—-
:   Yield per hectare   :      Production

Crop
:—————————–——————
:   2014    :   2015    :   2014    :   2015

—————————————————————————-
—-
:                  metric tons

:

Grains and hay                  :

Barley …………………….:    3.89                  3,849,230

Corn for grain ……………..:   10.73                361,091,140

Corn for silage …………….:   45.05                116,163,190

Hay, all 2/ ………………..:    5.49                126,822,610

Alfalfa ………………….:    7.47                 55,742,870

All other ………………..:    4.54                 71,079,740

Oats ………………………:    2.43                  1,011,460

Proso millet ……………….:    1.76                    305,790

Rice ………………………:    8.49                 10,025,980

Rye ……………………….:    1.75                    182,610

Sorghum for grain …………..:    4.24                 10,987,910

Sorghum for silage ………….:   29.34                  3,740,320

Wheat, all 2/ ………………:    2.94                 55,129,190

Winter …………………..:    2.87                 37,490,110

Durum ……………………:    2.67                  1,444,790

Other spring ……………..:    3.14                 16,194,280

:

Oilseeds                        :

Canola …………………….:    1.81                  1,138,970

Cottonseed …………………:     (X)                  4,820,780

Flaxseed …………………..:    1.32                    161,750

Mustard seed ……………….:    1.04                     13,160

Peanuts ……………………:    4.41                  2,363,260

Rapeseed …………………..:    1.38                      1,170

Safflower ………………….:    1.37                     94,640

Soybeans for beans ………….:    3.21                108,013,660

Sunflower ………………….:    1.65                  1,004,630

:

Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops:

Cotton, all 2/ ……………..:    0.89                  3,501,880

Upland …………………..:    0.88                  3,373,860

American Pima …………….:    1.67                    128,020

Sugarbeets …………………:   61.33                 28,472,900

Sugarcane ………………….:   79.17                 28,003,890

Tobacco ……………………:    2.60                    397,540

:

Dry beans, peas, and lentils    :

Austrian winter peas ………..:    1.50                     10,180

Dry edible beans ……………:    1.97                  1,324,760

Dry edible peas …………….:    2.14                    778,140

Lentils ……………………:    1.46                    152,720

Wrinkled seed peas ………….:    (NA)                     28,030

:

Potatoes and miscellaneous      :

Coffee (Hawaii) …………….:    1.15                      3,670

Hops ………………………:    2.09                     32,200

Peppermint oil ……………..:    0.10                      2,580

Potatoes, all 2/ ……………:   47.71                 20,261,650

Spring …………………..:   35.64                  1,025,480

Summer …………………..:   36.11                    714,680

Fall …………………….:   49.24                 18,521,490

Spearmint oil ………………:    0.13                      1,260

Sweet potatoes ……………..:   24.53                  1,341,910

Taro (Hawaii) ………………:    (NA)                      1,470

—————————————————————————-
—-
(NA) Not available.

(X)  Not applicable.

1/   Area planted for all purposes.

2/   Total may not add due to rounding.

3/   Area is total hectares in crop, not harvested hectares.

Fruits and Nuts Production – United States: 2014 and 2015 (Domestic Units)
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report
or from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2015
crop year, except citrus which is for the 2014-2015 season. Blank cells
indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
—————————————————————————
:         Production
Crop                    :—————————–
:     2014     :     2015
—————————————————————————
:            1,000
:
Citrus 1/                                    :
Grapefruit …………………………tons:      1,053        1,038
Lemons …………………………….tons:        832          888
Oranges ……………………………tons:      6,783        6,721
Tangelos (Florida) ………………….tons:         40           36
Tangerines and mandarins …………….tons:        726          748
:
Noncitrus                                    :
Apples ……………………..1,000 pounds:   10,888.4
Apricots …………………………..tons:       61.5
Bananas (Hawaii) ………………….pounds:
Grapes …………………………….tons:    7,937.5
Olives (California) …………………tons:
Papayas (Hawaii) ………………….pounds:
Peaches ……………………………tons:      863.9
Pears ……………………………..tons:      799.1
Prunes, dried (California) …………..tons:       95.0
Prunes and plums (excludes California) ..tons:
:
Nuts and miscellaneous                       :
Almonds, shelled (California) ………pounds:  2,100,000
Hazelnuts, in-shell (Oregon) …………tons:       36.0
Pecans, in-shell ………………….pounds:    275,620
Walnuts, in-shell (California) ……….tons:      545.0
Maple syrup ……………………..gallons:      3,167
—————————————————————————
1/ Production years are 2013-2014 and 2014-2015.

Fruits and Nuts Production in Metric Units – United States: 2014 and 2015
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report
or from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2015
crop year, except citrus which is for the 2014-2015 season. Blank cells
indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
—————————————————————————
:         Production
Crop                    :—————————–
:     2014     :     2015
—————————————————————————
:         metric tons
:
Citrus 1/                                    :
Grapefruit …………………………….:    955,270        941,660
Lemons ………………………………..:    754,780        805,580
Oranges ……………………………….:  6,153,430      6,097,190
Tangelos (Florida) ……………………..:     36,290         32,660
Tangerines and mandarins ………………..:    658,620        678,570
:
Noncitrus                                    :
Apples ………………………………..:  4,938,900
Apricots ………………………………:     55,780
Bananas (Hawaii) ……………………….:
Grapes ………………………………..:  7,200,780
Olives (California) …………………….:
Papayas (Hawaii) ……………………….:
Peaches ……………………………….:    783,680
Pears …………………………………:    724,930
Prunes, dried (California) ………………:     86,180
Prunes and plums (excludes California) ……:
:
Nuts and miscellaneous                       :
Almonds, shelled (California) ……………:    952,540
Hazelnuts, in-shell (Oregon) …………….:     32,660
Pecans, in-shell ……………………….:    125,020
Walnuts, in-shell (California) …………..:    494,420
Maple syrup ……………………………:     15,830
—————————————————————————
1/ Production years are 2013-2014 and 2014-2015.

December Weather Summary

Limited drought relief came to California in the form of several periods of
heavy precipitation, highlighted by a potent, moisture-laden storm on
December 11-12. Although the rain improved topsoil moisture benefited winter

grains and helped to revive rangeland and pastures, significant effects from

the 3-year drought persisted. For example, California’s reservoirs got a
slight boost from runoff, but collectively remained at near-record low
levels. And, since most of California’s storms were “warm” systems,
high-elevation snowpack remained below one-half of average for this time of
year.

Precipitation also spread into other areas of the West. Like California,
however, snowpack in the Pacific Northwest languished due to warm
conditions,
despite an abundance of storms. Fewer storms reached the Southwest, where
significantly below-average snowpack was also a concern.

Farther east, a very cold November was followed by a mostly mild December.
Thawing, muddy fields led to delays in final corn harvest efforts in the
Great Lakes region. Most other fieldwork across the South, East, and Midwest

was eventually curtailed, as increasingly wet conditions developed as the
month progressed. Just prior to the holidays, a sprawling storm system
produced wet snow across the northern Plains and Midwest, along with
torrential rainfall and locally severe thunderstorms in the Southeast.

Elsewhere, mid- to late-month precipitation (rain and snow) provided a
little
bit of beneficial moisture across winter wheat areas of the central and
southern Plains. Heading into the overwintering period, wheat-related
concerns included lingering drought (on the southern Plains); the effects of

November’s cold wave (on the central High Plains); and issues related to
late
planting and poor crop establishment (in the southern and eastern Corn
Belt).
From November 23 to the end of December, the portion of the winter wheat
rated in good to excellent condition fell from 69 to 57 percent in Nebraska;

61 to 49 percent in Kansas; and 56 to 24 percent in Illinois.

December Agricultural Summary

Virtually all of the United States recorded above normal temperatures for
the
month of December. Some small pockets recorded average temperatures more
than
9°F above normal in the northern Rocky Mountains and the Northern Plains.
Precipitation levels were generally within 2 inches of normal levels across
the Nation. The most notable exception occurred in northern California where

locations recorded over 16 inches of precipitation for the month. Storms
early in the month battered the region with winds in excess of 100 miles per

hour and higher elevations received several feet of snow. Despite
historically dry conditions in the area, the storms still resulted in
flooding and mudslides throughout the region.

Harvest delays caused corn producers in Wisconsin to continue fieldwork into

the month of December. On December 7, corn was 86 percent harvested in the
State, making 2014 the fourth-latest corn harvest in the past 30 years,
ahead
of 1985, 1992, and 2009. As of December 14, corn harvested was 91 percent
harvested, but fieldwork stalled as soils thawed creating muddy conditions
and the humidity drove already high grain moisture even higher. Some
producers will continue to put effort into harvesting the last of the
standing corn and soybeans, but reports indicate that some fields will be
left standing through the winter months.

In Kansas, winter wheat conditions were rated at 49 percent in the good to
excellent categories at the end of December, down from 61 percent on
November 23. The decrease in conditions is attributed to the lack of snow
cover in the State to protect wheat from colder winter temperatures. Areas
with greater snow cover reported high winter wheat ratings including Montana

at 65 percent good to excellent, Colorado at 62 percent good to excellent,
and Nebraska at 57 percent good to excellent.

Pasture and range conditions worsened in several parts of the Nation. In
Missouri, pasture conditions at the end of the month were rated 32 percent
in
the good to excellent categories, down 16 percentage points from November
23.
Oklahoma producers reported 30 percent of pasture in the good to excellent
categories, down 9 percentage points from November 23. In Montana, pasture
conditions were rated 35 percent in the good to excellent categories, down
7 percentage points from November 30.

In Florida, citrus production benefited from adequate precipitation and
warmer than average temperatures during December. The beginning of the month

saw the harvest of early variety oranges, grapefruit and tangerines.
Producers are reporting overall good quality in fresh fruit, but fruit size
is very small compared to a normal year. By the end of December, most
processing plants have opened for the season. Navel orange harvest and white

and colored grapefruit harvest is slightly lagging behind last season but
overall running at a good pace.

Crop Comments

Grapefruit: The 2014-2015 United States grapefruit crop is forecast at
1.04 million tons, down 1 percent from last season’s final utilization, but
up 1 percent from last month’s forecast. In Florida, current fruit size of
white and colored grapefruit is less than average and is expected to be
close
to the minimum at harvest. Also in Florida, the current droppage for both
white and colored grapefruit is expected to be close to the maximum at
harvest.

Lemons: The forecast for the 2014-2015 United States lemon crop is
888,000 tons, up 7 percent from last season’s final utilization. In
California, lemon harvest was well underway with reported rain during
December having a positive impact on the crop development.

Tangelos: Florida’s tangelo forecast is 800,000 boxes (36,000 tons),
down 10 percent from last season’s final utilization, but unchanged from
last
month’s forecast. Projected fruit size is below average and projected
droppage is above average.

Tangerines and mandarins: The United States tangerine and mandarin crop is
forecast at 748,000 tons, up 3 percent from last season’s final utilization
but down 3 percent from the December forecast. In Florida, harvest of
Fallglo
varieties is complete for the season and harvest of Sunburst tangerines is
almost complete. The harvesting of the late maturing Honey tangerine is
beginning. Projected Honey fruit size is slightly below the minimum while
the
projected droppage is slightly above the maximum. In California, the Satsuma

harvest is complete.

Florida citrus: Across the citrus growing region, reported rainfall amounts
were less than average for this time of the year. However, all citrus
producing areas were void of abnormally dry or drought conditions throughout

the month. After a cool front passed over the State during the second week,
daily highs warmed to the mid 80s, bringing monthly temperatures closer to
average.

Processing plants shut down for the Christmas holidays, but by the end of
month were up and running at full capacity, taking both eliminations and
field run fruit. Reported weekly harvesting amounts were low, due to the
small size fruit and late maturity of early oranges. Early-mid orange
varieties harvested for processing included both Hamlin and Pineapple
oranges. Early variety fruit harvested for the fresh market included Navel
oranges, Sunburst tangerines, white and colored grapefruit, and limited
amounts of tangelos.

Grove activity included spraying, irrigation on several days during the
month, and mowing in preparation for harvest. Citrus grower’s field
activities to combat greening continued and were causing some challenges as
re-entry times after spraying were reported as ranging between forty-eight
hours and ten days.

California citrus: The color in navel oranges was reported to be improving
and exports were on the rise. Mandarin oranges, grapefruits, finger limes,
and lemons continued to be packed and shipped to foreign markets. Growers
treated citrus groves for fungal diseases and Fuller Rose Beetle infestation

to maintain export quality.

California noncitrus fruits and nuts: Shelling, processing and exporting of
stored almonds to foreign and domestic markets were ongoing. Olive,
persimmon, and late variety table grape harvests continued but were winding
down by the middle of the month. The walnut and pistachio harvests were
reported as completed by the beginning of December. Harvested fruit and nut
orchards received post-harvest irrigation, pruning, shredding, and spraying
for weeds. Growers fertilized their crops in preparation for their dormant
season. Due to heavy rains in the middle of December most field and orchard
activity was halted due to the fields being saturated.

Hay stocks on farms: All hay stored on United States farms December 1, 2014
totaled 92.1 million tons, up 3 percent from the previous December.
Disappearance from May 1, 2014 – December 1, 2014 totaled 66.9 million tons,

compared with 59.9 million tons for the same period a year earlier.

December 1 hay stocks were up from 2013 in many centrally located States due

to larger production totals in 2014 as a result of good weather conditions
during the growing season. However, persistent dry weather in several
western
States limited production and hay stock levels.

Statistical Methodology

Survey procedures: The orange objective yield survey for the January 1
forecast was conducted in Florida, which produces about 69 percent of the
United States production. Bearing tree numbers are determined at the start
of
the season based on a fruit tree census conducted every other year, combined

with ongoing review based on administrative data or special surveys. From
mid-July to mid-September, the number of fruit per tree is determined. In
August and subsequent months, fruit size measurement and fruit droppage
surveys are conducted, which combined with the previous components are used
to develop the current forecast of production. California and Texas conduct
grower and packer surveys on a quarterly basis in October, January, April,
and July. California conducts an objective measurement survey in September
for Navel oranges and in March for Valencia oranges.

Estimating procedures: State level objective yield estimates for Florida
oranges were reviewed for errors, reasonableness, and consistency with
historical estimates. Reports from growers and packers in California and
Texas were also used for setting estimates. These three States submit their
analyses of the current situation to the Agricultural Statistics Board
(ASB).
The ASB uses the survey data and the State analyses to prepare the published

January 1 forecast.

Revision policy: The January 1 production forecasts will not be revised. A
new forecast will be made each month throughout the growing season. End-of-
season estimates will be published in the Citrus Fruits Summary released in
September. The production estimates are based on all data available at the
end of the marketing season, including information from marketing orders,
shipments, and processor records. Allowances are made for recorded local
utilization and home use.

Reliability: To assist users in evaluating the reliability of the January 1
production forecasts, the “Root Mean Square Error,” a statistical measure
based on past performance, is computed. The deviation between the January 1
production forecast and the final estimate is expressed as a percentage of
the final estimate. The average of squared percentage deviations for the
latest 20-year period is computed. The square root of the average becomes
statistically the “Root Mean Square Error.” Probability statements can be
made concerning expected differences in the current forecast relative to the

final end-of-season estimate, assuming that factors affecting this year’s
forecast are not different from those influencing recent years.

The “Root Mean Square Error” for the January 1 orange production forecast is

3.9 percent. However, if you exclude the three abnormal production years
(one
freeze season and two hurricane seasons), the “Root Mean Square Error” is
4.0 percent. This means that chances are 2 out of 3 that the current orange
production forecast will not be above or below the final estimates by more
than 3.9 percent, or 4.0 percent excluding abnormal seasons. Chances are 9
out of 10 (90 percent confidence level) that the difference will not exceed
6.8 percent, or 7.0 percent excluding abnormal seasons.

Changes between the January 1 orange forecast and the final estimates during

the past 20 years have averaged 313,000 tons (319,000 tons excluding
abnormal
seasons), ranging from 2,000 tons to 638,000 tons regardless of exclusions.
The January 1 forecast for oranges has been below the final estimate 7 times

and above 13 times (below 7 times and above 10 times, excluding abnormal
seasons). The difference does not imply that the January 1 forecast this
year
is likely to understate or overstate final production.

Information Contacts

Listed below are the commodity statisticians in the Crops Branch of the
National Agricultural Statistics
Service to contact for additional information. E-mail inquiries may be sent
to [email protected]

Lance Honig, Chief, Crops
Branch……………………………………………… (202) 720-2127

Anthony Prillaman, Head, Field Crops
Section…………………..………………. (202) 720-2127
Brent Chittenden – Oats, Rye,
Wheat…………………….………………… (202) 720-8068
Angie Considine – Cotton, Cotton Ginnings,
Sorghum…………………..…….. (202) 720-5944
Tony Dahlman – Crop Weather,
Barley………………………………………. (202) 720-7621
Chris Hawthorn – Corn, Flaxseed, Proso
Millet……………………………… (202) 720-9526
James Johanson – County Estimates,
Hay……………………………………. (202) 690-8533
Anthony Prillaman – Peanuts,
Rice……………………..…………………. (202) 720-2127
Travis Thorson – Soybeans, Sunflower, Other
Oilseeds………………….……. (202) 720-7369

Jorge Garcia-Pratts, Head, Fruits, Vegetables and Special Crops
Section…………… (202) 720-2127
Vincent Davis – Fresh and Processing Vegetables, Onions, Strawberries,
Cherries.. (202) 720-2157
Fleming Gibson – Citrus, Coffee, Grapes, Sugar Crops, Tropical
Fruits………… (202) 720-5412
Greg Lemmons – Berries, Cranberries, Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes
………………. (202) 720-4285
Dave Losh –
Hops……………………..………………………………… (360)
709-2400
Dan Norris – Austrian Winter Peas, Dry Edible Peas, Lentils, Mint,
Mushrooms, Peaches, Pears, Wrinkled Seed Peas, Dry Beans
………………. (202) 720-3250
Daphne Schauber – Floriculture, Maple Syrup, Nursery, Tree Nuts
…………….. (202) 720-4215
Chris Singh – Apples, Apricots, Plums, Prunes, Tobacco
…………………….. (202) 720-4288

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mail subscription. To set-up this free subscription, visit
http://www.nass.usda.gov and in the “Follow NASS” box under “Receive
reports by Email,” click on “National” or “State” to select the reports
you would like to receive.

For more information on NASS surveys and reports, call the NASS Agricultural

Statistics Hotline at (800) 727-9540, 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, or e-mail:
[email protected].

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination against
its customers, employees, and applicants for employment on the basis of
race,
color, national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity, religion,
reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial
or parental status, sexual orientation, or all or part of an individual’s
income is derived from any public assistance program, or protected genetic
information in employment or in any program or activity conducted or funded
by the Department. (Not all prohibited bases will apply to all programs
and/or employment activities.)
If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination,
complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (PDF), found online
at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, or at any USDA
office, or call (866) 632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a
letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your
completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of
Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue,
S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202) 690-7442 or email at
[email protected].

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